A Q&A on the Future of Work

A Q&A on the Future of Work

In late November 2018, I delivered the opening keynote at the Future of Work 2018 Conference hosted by the University of Melbourne Center for Workplace Leadership[1], where I described how to keep people at the center of the future of work discussion. After my talk (which I will post after a public link is available), I was interviewed for a short video segment to share the highlights. In preparing for the interview, I found the questions to explore a thoughtful, comprehensive look at the scope of the discussion on the future of work, and thus I wanted to share my answers. 

I am interested in your reactions. Do you agree with my thoughts? Disagree? Why?

Visualizing Jobs of the Future: Putting People at the Center in the Future of Work

Visualizing Jobs of the Future: Putting People at the Center in the Future of Work

It is clear there is not a consensus on what the overall job loss or creation impact of emerging technologies could be with wide ranging estimates of across sectors. Further, while predictions for job loss like these abound, there are far fewer organizations working on envisioning the future of work and the jobs of the future that will employ the workforce of the future as current jobs are changed by automation and other emerging technologies. 

This is where I’ve focused my research with my digitalHKS research fellowship. Since January 2018 I’ve been collaborating with Bill Eggers and Amrita Datar from the Deloitte Center for Government insights to humanize the future of work and visualize the impact of technology on jobs to empower organizations, employees, and individuals to create a more positive future. 

Eight Common Challenges to Scaling Innovation

Eight Common Challenges to Scaling Innovation

Implementing an innovative approach within the federal government takes relentlessness, stamina, and strategy. It can be incredibly lonely. You are often your own best champion. It can feel impossible-- like being the underdog trying to win a sporting match. But after all the frustrations and setbacks, when you win that first match it is also overwhelmingly satisfying.

But for the change agents in government, winning the first match is not enough. To make innovative approaches more routine, winning one match is just the beginning. The scaling challenge begins when you try to win over and over—and when you try to get more people to join your team.

Reflecting on the "end" of the Obama OSTP

Reflecting on the "end" of the Obama OSTP

Last night The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy held its farewell party for all current staff and Obama Administration OSTP Alumni. It was extremely bitter sweet. 

On one hand I feel SO proud and grateful to have worked for the most science and technology literate President and the most ambitious Science Advisor in my lifetime thus far; I feel so lucky to have worked closely with the concentration of high caliber colleagues and friends at OSTP working to empower a network of innovators within and outside government, to deliver sound science and technology policy on a staggering number of topics, and build coalitions to accelerate and sustain policy implementation. This A-team group of alumni won't stop working for good even if they're no longer in the White House.

Incentivizing Innovation: A New Toolkit for Federal Agencies

Incentivizing Innovation: A New Toolkit for Federal Agencies

Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the General Services Administration (GSA) are launching a new Challenges and Prizes Toolkit to help Federal agencies increase the use and sophistication of incentive prizes even further.

Collaboration Gives Federal Government Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing a New Home on the Web

Collaboration Gives Federal Government Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing a New Home on the Web

Yesterday, in conjunction with the 6th White House Science Fair, the White House announced that the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) has partnered with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars (WWICS), a Trust instrumentality of the U.S. Government, to launch CitizenScience.gov as the new hub for citizen science and crowdsourcing initiatives in the public sector.

Announcing the “Fellows in Innovation:” A Coalition Contributing Fresh Ideas on National Priorities

Announcing the “Fellows in Innovation:” A Coalition Contributing Fresh Ideas on National Priorities

One of the Federal government’s great assets is the talented cadre of individuals who join its ranks each year as part of a variety of fellowship programs. Participants in these programs bring enthusiasm, new ideas, and fresh perspectives to Federal departments and agencies every day. Last year, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) convened a workshop of 100 participants in fellowship programs that place individuals in the Federal government to discuss how to apply creative 21st century tools to their fellowship projects, and how to use these tools to inspire and ignite innovation in government.

Applying the Innovation Toolkit to Bring Cancer Nanotechnology Inventions to Market

To support the United States as a nation of innovators, the Administration has introduced many tools to the Federal government’s innovation toolkit. As described in the Strategy for American Innovation, these tools are aimed at uncovering the best ideas, wherever they may lie, and creating opportunities for those ideas to find their way to the marketplace. It is rare to find a program that opens that toolbox as wide as the Nanotechnology Startup Challenge for Cancer (NSC2) — an open-innovation competition designed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the non-profit Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI) to bring promising cancer nanotechnology inventions to market.

Building Momentum for Open Innovation

Building Momentum for Open Innovation

The White House, the Federal Community of Practice on Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing (CCS), and the General Services Administration (GSA)’s Challenge.gov program have been working diligently over the last two years to deliver on previous commitments. This work was highlighted in a series of events this fall designed to build momentum both within and outside the Federal government for more ambitious, cross-sector applications of open innovation approaches.

The People and Teams that Power High-Impact Incentive Prizes

The Administration is helping organize two events this week to celebrate the success of Challenge.gov, recognize the importance of public-sector prizes, and catalyze the next-generation of ambitious prizes. On Wednesday, October 7, the White House, the Case Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, and Georgetown University will host an event titled “All Hands on Deck: Solving Complex Problems through Prizes and Challenges” that will provide Federal, state, and local government leaders and private-sector supporters with information and tools on how to effectively use incentive prizes to improve outcomes in addressing complex social, policy, and technological challenges in national priority areas. On Thursday, October 8, the General Services Administration will host a community of more than 300 prize practitioners to celebrate the great accomplishments of public-sector prizes at a five-year anniversary event for Challenge.gov.

This October, the White House Celebrates Over $150 Million in Prize Competitions Since 2010

This October, the White House Celebrates Over $150 Million in Prize Competitions Since 2010

To celebrate the accomplishments of prize competitions and to inspire the next generation of ambitious, cross-sector prizes, the White House, the General Services Administration (GSA), nonprofits, and academic institutions will host back-to-back events in Washington, DC, one on October 7 and the other on October 8, in Washington DC.  These two events will highlight the impact of open innovation in the Federal government and across sectors, as well as celebrate the successes of Challenge.gov

Open Science and Innovation: Of the People, By the People, For the People

Open Science and Innovation: Of the People, By the People, For the People

Only a small fraction of Americans are formally trained as “scientists.” But that doesn’t mean that only a small fraction of Americans can participate in scientific discovery and innovation.  Citizen science and crowdsourcing are approaches that educate, engage, and empower the public to apply their curiosity and talents to a wide range of real-world problems. To raise awareness of these tools and encourage more Americans to take advantage of them, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the Domestic Policy Council will host “Open Science and Innovation: Of the People, By the People, For the People,” a live-webcast forum, on Wednesday, September 30th.

Accelerating the Use of Prizes to Address Tough Challenges

To build on momentum, the Administration will hold an event this fall to highlight the role that prizes play in solving critical national and global issues. The event will showcase public- and private-sector relevant commitments from Federal, state, and local agencies, companies, foundations, universities, and non-profits. 

Public Sector Prizes and Challenges Show Increased Sophistication, Ambition and Use: A Fiscal Year 2014 Progress Report

Public Sector Prizes and Challenges Show Increased Sophistication, Ambition and Use: A Fiscal Year 2014 Progress Report

Today, OSTP released its fourth annual comprehensive report detailing the use of prize competitions and challenges by Federal agencies to spur innovation, engage citizen solvers, address tough problems, and advance their core missions. This report details the remarkable results from 97 prize competitions and challenges offered by 30 agencies under a variety of authorities in FY 2014 as required by Section 105 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (COMPETES) added Section 24 (Prize Competitions) to the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 (Stevenson-Wydler).

Growing the Network of Innovators in Government

Growing the Network of Innovators in Government

Participants in a variety of Federal fellowship programs bring enthusiasm, new ideas, and fresh perspectives to Federal departments and agencies every day. Last week, the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) convened a workshop to teach 100 current participants in Federal fellowship programs how to apply creative 21st-century tools to their fellowship projects, and to use these tools to inspire and ignite innovation in government.

21st-Century Public Servants: Using Prizes and Challenges to Spur Innovation

21st-Century Public Servants: Using Prizes and Challenges to Spur Innovation

Last month, the Challenge.gov program at the General Services Administration (GSA), the Office of Personnel Management (OPM)’s Innovation Lab, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and a core team of Federal leaders in the prize-practitioner community began collaborating with the Federal Community of Practice for Challenges and Prizes to develop the other half of the open innovation toolkit, the prizes and challenges toolkit. In developing this toolkit, OSTP and GSA are thinking not only about the information and process resources that would be helpful to empower 21st-century public servants using these tools, but also how we help connect these people to one another to add another meaningful layer to the learning environment.

Citizen Science is Everywhere, including the White House

Citizen Science is Everywhere, including the White House

The 5th White House Science Fair, the gave the Obama Administration and a broader community of companies, non-profits, and others an opportunity to announce new steps to increase the ability of students and members of the public to participate in the scientific process through citizen science.  One of these commitments came from the White House itself, showing that anyone, anywhere can participate in citizen science!

Citizen Science Contributes to Advances in Scientific Understanding

Citizen Science Contributes to Advances in Scientific Understanding

Every day, citizens like you help career scientists advance scientific discovery and understanding of the world around us. Two recent success stories demonstrate the enormous value of citizen science contributions.